Friday, September 22, 2017

Those without eyes will see

In response to this VT story, Alex said,

Makes me wonder if she read the same BG where Krishna instructs Arjuna to not be a coward and fight: "She said that the Gita impressed upon her that, “The path to the truth is non-violent and no one should insult anyone else.”

My thought:

Well, if you think about it a couple of steps of logic down, you could make a case. That is not a problem.

On the other hand, you could ask whether it is appropriate to deduce that the Gita was about getting along and letting each other live. To which I say a good message found in a nasty place is still a good message.

She could have said, "Right, Krishna is like fighting a stupid religious war. So Hindus and Muslims should kill each other like our good lords intended, right?"

That would also have been a rational message, perhaps a little more prosaic. A little more external an understanding of the Bhagavad Gita.

My faith is that the Gita is a spiritual book, set in a particular cultural environment, but its wisdom is on the side of eternal "good" things, like peace and love and harmony and unity. The paradoxes it presents are deliberate and necessary, because no description of reality that did not contain paradox would be complete.

That is the premise. Now further arguments ensue, but the crux of the matter is that without a dominant body of individuals cultivating peace, genuine inner peace, genuine spiritual peace, there can be no enforcing of it among the rajasic and tamasic folk.

The Gita and indeed all shastras are "desire trees" in their capacity for multiple interpretations, which means multiple frames of reference based in multiple subjectivities or adhikaras.

Of what use is a shastra if it has multiple standpoints and is unclear? you may ask.

I would say, it is intentionally unclear or contradictory. Through these flash points of sensitivity it stimulates a unique collective world view, with a frame based on a certain collection of arguments about reality, what it is, what is its purpose, and what might be done about it, i.e., what kind of reality do we want to construct?

Is that good? Of course, because the frame in the Gita is centered on discussions about the truth of the self and the ways of knowing and discovering it. These are the what create the parameters of the arguments it stimulates.

The worst kind of person is the one who wants to enforce a uniform instruction on a text like the Gita. That is because the basic instruction of the Gita is to surrender to God. Period. And the most important God is the one instructing you -- the individual -- from within, not from without.

The rest of the Gita is just explaining to you the rationale for surrendering, as well as how to go about it and so on. A manual for practical spiritual intelligence, if you will.

6 comments:

Prem Prakash said...

There was reference but no link to the VT story.

Anonymous said...

When the Eye of Europa is opened wide to the enemy within, a great flood of seiðr will sweep across the Earth

There is a very ancient Ásatrú (Æsir –“to carry across as [a] beam [spear] of light”) narrative in the Edda, that of the Fenrisúlfr and the God Týr.

The Wolf, Fenrisúlfr whom (in a deal [Old Norse “deila” - "to divide, divided"]) has swallowed the hand of the shining God Týr (a Norse equivalent of the Sanatana dharma’s [Vedic] shining Son, Kṛṣṇa), the hidden hand of Týr in the belly of the Wolf (whom has swallowed the hand of division), which represents the five afflictions (avidyā, asmitā, rāga, dveṣa, abhiniveśa), binds the flesh of Fenrisúlfr (the Wolf's mouth which tears and rips).

Fenrisúlfr has been let slip, and Ragnarök soon comes Jagadananda Das, the gushing inundation(of abhiṣeka) is coming, a great flood of seiðr will sweep across this Earth.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MV6LT8Jl-bA

Ask veit ek standa,
heitir Yggdrasill
hár baðmr, ausinn
hvíta auri;
þaðan koma döggvar
þærs í dala falla;
stendr æ yfir grœnn
Urðar brunni.

There stands an ash called Yggdrasil,
A mighty tree showered in white hail.
From there come the dews that fall in the valleys.
It stands evergreen above Urd’s Well.

Source: https://norse-mythology.org/learn-old-norse/

Notes

https://norse-mythology.org/concepts/seidr/


Pat Condell said...

Pat Condell, a voice of the times:

https://www.bitchute.com/video/y8t2TnJYLXAe/

https://www.bitchute.com/video/ziEfXTP0gkpJ/

https://www.bitchute.com/video/hv0B1gzppHX2/

https://www.bitchute.com/video/THWPJE4xaJM/

https://www.bitchute.com/video/GjYLWadz5Yc/

Notes

https://twitter.com/patcondell

you're drunk, you're drunk you silly old fool said...

The Dubliners - Seven Drunken Nights

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RCnV0JxLHg

Lyrics:

As I went home on Monday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a horse outside the door where my old horse should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that horse outside the door where my old horse should be?

Ah, you're drunk,
you're drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That's a lovely sow that me mother sent to me
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more
But a saddle on a sow sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a coat behind the door where my old coat should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that coat behind the door where my old coat should be

Ah, you're drunk,
you're drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That's a woollen blanket that me mother sent to me
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more
But buttons in a blanket sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be

Ah, you're drunk,
you're drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That's a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to me
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more
But tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Thursday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw two boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns them boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be

Ah, you're drunk,
you're drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
They're two lovely Geranium pots me mother sent to me
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more
But laces in Geranium pots I never saw before

And as I went home on Friday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a head upon the bed where my old head should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that head upon the bed where my old head should be

Ah, you're drunk,
you're drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That's a baby boy that me mother sent to me
Well, it's many a day I've travelled a hundred miles or more
But a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before

Anonymous said...

In the spirit of the previous'voice of the times' (Pat Condell), here is another voice of the times from the United Kingdom, Alison Chabloz.

Alison Chabloz Tours Canada

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJdDuAUDUZ4

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNgVxhVdfWo

Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkhmlPVsaWM

Ashwin Singh said...


"According to Lord Krishn, when a seeker sets out on the path of worship, desire and anger, and attraction and repulsion appear as frightening hurdles in his way. To fight and overcome these negative impulses is war. Entering progressively deeper into the state of meditation by gradual elimination of the demoniacal, alien impulses of Kurukshetr is war. So this is a war which rages in the state of meditation."

Read the rest at:

https://www.quora.com/Why-did-Krishna-want-Arjuna-to-fight-the-Mahabharat-war